Posted July 15, 2013 by in Skin and Body Care

The skin is the largest organ of the body but being that as it may, it does not mean that it gets first dibs or any preferential treatment as far as water distribution in the body goes. Water is a refreshing and a very much needed resource to keep both our skin and body functioning correctly, a lack of water results in dehydration and in response our systems start to shut down.

Too much water results in over taxing our system, flushing out much needed vitamins, minerals and chronic medications. As in life a good balance is recommended.
The reality is that as we drink water so it moves through the intestines, gets absorbed into the bloodstream and eventually filtered by the kidneys, very little water makes its way to your skin directly.

What effects the hydration of the skin? 

Environment
If we have constant exposure to the sun, wind, snow, sea air and extreme heat our skins moisture evaporates ,and leaves the skin susceptible to the harsh elements which results in unseen skin damage. This only surfaces later on in life at around the age of 35+ years.
Smoking dehydrates the skin and aids in premature aging due to the aggressors in cigarette smoke which settle on and oxidize the skin (almost like causing the skin to rust).
Air-conditioned environments whether hot or cold strip the skin of moisture and result in taut and dry skins .
Skin tip: always try and use an antioxidant supplement and ensure that you apply a good sunscreen with an SPF 30+ and give your skin a boost at least every 6 months with a hydrating serum.

Diet
Ever heard that old saying ‘we are what we eat’? Well it’s also true that we are what we don’t eat! Our skins need healthy nourishment both inside and out. This requires that we consume essential fatty acids and healthy natural oils, two prime examples are Avocado’s and Flaxseed oil. These assist to form a lipid barrier on the skin that acts as a natural defense and prevents superficial dehydration of the skin surface.
Other good sources of healthy fatty acids are olive oil, walnuts and oily fish such as salmon.
Skin tip: I have found by taking an Omega 3, 6 and 9 supplement it significantly slows down my skins aging and also balances my hormones resulting in fewer breakouts.

Stress levels
The more stressed we are the more nourishment, energy and resources are used to cope with all the additional needs of the body and so the skin takes strain. Stress usually results in interrupted sleep patterns and when we are tired our energy is sapped and both our body and skin looks withered and tired.
Skin tip: During stressful periods try and avoid excess caffeine, alcohol and sugar as these dehydrate and give false energy highs resulting in very low lows.

Age
As we get older out metabolism slows down in both the skin and the body and so we see a dramatic change in skin texture, skin hydration, collagen and elastin production and hydration to the skin. We cannot stop the ageing process but we can use the correct supplements and good skin care products to plump up the skin.
 Skin tip: Skin peels are great at this stage to give your skin a jump start, skin care products jam packed with Hyaluronic acid are a good investment as these plump up the skin. Dermal fillers can be used to fill areas that start to hollow under the eyes and around the mouth.

No matter whether you drink 2 glasses of water a day or 8 glasses you will still need to make use of good supplement to feed your skin from the inside and a good skin care range that can protect your skin from the outside. Our bodies do need water and so if you are a person that already drinks 8 glasses of water a day it can only benefit your bodies functioning and overall health.